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Lisbon Declaration: Scare Stories about Sex Cost Lives

15 Jun

Don't Get Stuck With HIV

Why would women in an African country fear being diagnosed HIV positive, refuse to take part in a treatment program that would keep them alive, and probably prevent them from infecting others? After all, the virus has been around for over 30 years and treatment has been available, free of charge, for more than a decade. We know how it can be spread, we just haven’t agreed on which are the most dangerous modes of transmission. But a study has found that women believe their husbands and families will reject them, perhaps divorce, disinherit, physically attack or even kill them because of their status.

Well, it’s not quite clear why Measure Evaluation felt the need to ask women why they were afraid, given the role of the HIV industry in stirring up that fear. Do the researchers think anyone would like to be diagnosed HIV positive and have to go…

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Long Standing De Facto Gag Rule on HIV in ‘Africa’

26 Jan

Don't Get Stuck With HIV

The gag rule about abortion is not the only gag rule, and even the ‘global gag rule’ never went away in developing countries. Organizations running sexuality, HIV, reproductive health and other programs have long had to cover up anything that might appear to show a pro choice attitude of any kind.

They knew that funding, especially from the US, would be threatened by even appearing to be pro choice in any way.

But there is a much more pervasive gag rule relating to HIV in high prevalence countries, all of which are in Africa. The history of HIV has some very shocking aspects that you won’t hear much about through reading some of the better known literature.

A chapter from John Potterat’s Seeking the Positives, entitled ‘Why Africa?: The Puzzle of Intense HIV Transmission in Heterosexuals‘ is available free of charge on ResearchGate.net. Potterat delves into a long…

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Dear Researcher, What Kind of Whore am I?

16 Jan

Don't Get Stuck With HIV

My last blog post was about a researcher who seems to have found what she was looking for (young girls who claim to have had sex for money to buy sanitary towels) and now uses the finding to get publicity and, presumably, funding, or justification for funding if she has already received some.

Ten percent of the 15 year olds, allegedly, made this claim, which amounts to fewer than 20 people from a survey of 3000. But the researcher took what they said at face value because they were saying the right thing. The researcher is selling menstrual cups (specifically, mooncups) in a high HIV prevalence area.

Another piece of research looked at serodiscordance, where each partner in a couple has a different HIV status, one positive and one negative (or they are each infected with a recognizably distinct viral type). It was found that more women than men are…

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Questionable Research: Are Menstrual Cups A Hard Sell?

15 Jan

Don't Get Stuck With HIV

In May of 2016, the English Guardian gushed:

“‘Girls are literally selling their bodies to get sanitary pads,’ says Dr Penelope Phillips-Howard. ‘When we did our study in Kenya, one in ten of the 15 year old girls told us that they had engaged in sex in order to get money to buy pads.'”

The 2015 study that they carried out is more careful in some ways. “Caution is suggested in interpreting the data provided, and particularly for analyses on low prevalence behaviors such as sex for money for sanitary products.” The study also reveals that the number of 15 year olds who claimed to have had sex to get money, specifically to get sanitary pads, was fewer than 20.

Another Guardian article appeared in the last few days on the same subject. The articles are both promoting a menstrual cup as an alternative to expensive, disposable sanitary…

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Zimbabwe: Thought Embargo at HIV Inc to Continue Indefinitely

17 Aug

Don't Get Stuck With HIV

The Zimbabwean health minister, David Parirenyatwa, has exposed his complete ignorance about the country’s HIV epidemic by claiming that there is ‘rampant homosexuality’ in prisons, and that this is making an especially large contribution to high rates of HIV transmission in these institutions.

Naturally, there are some men who have sex with men in prisons, and not just in Zimbabwe. But that is not just because men are more likely to have sex with men when incarcerated for lengthy periods with men, denied conjugal visits and other rights. It’s also because having sex with someone of the same gender can itself attract a prison sentence.

However, what the health minister fails to realize is that there tend to be very poor health services in prisons. If he had inspected health services in prisons he would have come to a very different conclusion. Indeed, had he inspected health services outside…

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‘African’ Sexuality: Consensus or Prejudice?

12 Aug

Don't Get Stuck With HIV

An article by Damien de Walque, entitled ‘Is male promiscuity the main route of HIV/AIDS transmission in Africa?‘, seems curiously behind the times. He refers to the “pervasive if unstated belief in the HIV/AIDS community…that males are primarily responsible for spreading the infection among married and cohabiting couples”.

Disturbingly, de Walque goes on to conclude that, because women are as likely as men to be the infected partner in discordant relationships (where only one partner is HIV positive), both male and female promiscuity must be the main route of transmission. This is by no means the only possible conclusion; far more women than men are infected with HIV in high prevalence African countries, but this could be a result of other risks, particularly non-sexual risks.

However, women being almost as likely as men to be the infected partner in discordant relationships was not a new discovery when de Walque was writing in…

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UNAIDS Becomes UNAZI – Focus At Last?

7 Aug

Don't Get Stuck With HIV

UNAIDS reached 20 and became 21 without anyone really noticing. HIV prevalence had peaked in some of the worst affected countries by the time the institution was established, but many epidemics had only just begun.

For example, HIV prevalence in South Africa was very low in 1990, probably less than 1%. Along with several other southern African countries, prevalence rocketed for much of the following 10 to 15 years, eventually making this zone the worst affected in the world.

HIV epidemics tend to concentrate in certain zones, rather than in certain countries. A large area in southern Africa constitutes one of these zones, taking in much of South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Botswana, Swaziland, Lesotho, Namibia and parts of Mozambique and Malawi.

But some zones are not best described by national boundaries. The areas surrounding Lake Victoria, for example, make up another zone, bringing together a large proportion of the HIV…

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